Windows Mobile 2003 SE – Time Travel

30 Comments

Leave a Reply
  1. Where Windows Mobile really excels everyone is real, true multitasking; not the kind of stuff iOS has, but way better. I remember playing music on WMP and recording video without a problem back in the day when I had a Moto Q9h. Even now I have a WM device that is used daily; a flip phone, that is. All the apps run simultaneously, even though the phone is closed and at the home screen.

  2. 2…2…2003? Why ain't no one hear about this? This had EVERYTHING in one like our devices today. The only thing this didn't have was touch screen. Like….We all think Iphone was the first smart phone. Sorry, hun. Microsoft did it when they were a good company that everyone liked.

  3. I'm getting so much nostalgia. Back around ~2011 I had a very small collection of Pocket PCs. A later media-centered iPAQ and a Dell Axim x51 (no v). I also had a Palm Tungsten E2 and an early-gen monochrome Palm Zire. I even got videos playing on all of them except for the Zire 😀

  4. I want to mention two things. First, there wasn't a thing called Window Mobile 7. It was called Windows Phone 7, and introduced the metro UI, and was almost entirely rewritten. And the current iteration is called Windows 10 Mobile, and not, I repeat, NOT Windows Phone 10…

  5. Holy shit this one used to be rebranded helluva lot of times… My friend had this one, branded as the HTC Blue Angel back in 2012. I believe that is its original name. He managed to put Android 2.3 on it! But he later switched to Windows Mobile 6.5, cause it was too buggy and sluggish. It was so heavy… man… Especially with the extended battery lol. No wonder he wore his pants so low.

  6. I had that same phone, although it was branded as a Qtek 9090. Loved the device, I remember you could flash Windows Mobile 6.5 (which I think is pretty impressive for a 2003 device) and you could boot Android 2.3 from an SD Card.

  7. "IR Blaster which was used for sending and receiving files over Bluetooth"
    Hah, I wish. The transfers were done entirely over the IR connection, where dust could slow it down. Good times…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

seventeen − seven =